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The Top 10 Greatest Goals of the 90s

10 David Platt

England v Belgium, 26 June 1990

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QtqiBAg2biw

Screen Shot 2015-10-29 at 11.23.39We kick-off with a goal right at the start of the decade, where our football education begun, at Italia 90. This second round game between England and Belgium was seconds from going to a penalty shoot-out until Paul Gascoigne floated a free-kick into the box, which was met on a spinning volley with his back to goal from David Platt. Gary Lineker’s beaming face in the subsequent celebration bundle a lasting image from the game.

 

9 Eric Cantona

Manchester United v Sunderland, 21 December 1996

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M1uOZbH2qNg

Screen Shot 2015-10-29 at 11.23.59Football is wonderful when just a goal can sum-up a maverick footballer like Eric Cantona. From the skill and strength of getting past two Sunderland defenders, the vision of the one-two with Brian McClair and the audacious chip finish. All topped off with a non-celebration that screamed ‘all in a days work mate’.

 

8 Tony Yeboah

Leeds United v Liverpool, 17 August 1995

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RK2aU9m4nW8

1960872762This goal was beaten to Goal of the Season by another Yeboah strike against Wimbledon weeks later, but we’ve plumped for this worldy that Sky continues to show to this day. Tony Dorigo’s ball was headed on by Rod Wallace, and the Ghanaian met it with an explosive volley that hit the underside of the ball and went in.

 

 

7 Matt Le Tissier

Blackburn v Southampton, 10 December 1994

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y-bxrIoxg-w

Matt Le Tissier- Southampton v Newcastle United, 1993–94We could have done a whole countdown just of Matt’s goals alone, with both his strikes against Newcastle at the Dell missing out. However this goal is probably his best, a couple of jinx past the Rovers defence was followed by a thunderbolt from all of thirty yards into the top corner, and past best mate Tim Flowers.

 

6 David Beckham

Wimbledon v Manchester United, 14 August 1996

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_R3f5OW2mN4

Generated by IJG JPEG Library

Generated by IJG JPEG Library

A goal that an footballing icon was born out of, who knows how the David Beckham story would have gone if this goal hadn’t kick-started it all. The young Becks received the ball on the halfway line, took one look up and launched the ball down field and beyond a helpless Neil Sullivan. A goal so good it should have been a shoe-in for Goal of the Season, however……

 

5 Trevor Sinclair

QPR v Barnsley, 25 January 1997

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vpXWKKOVQWs

sinclairpa_3148502kYes, it was this acrobatic effort from QPR’s Trevor Sinclair that beat Becks to Goal of the Season, and unbiased loyalties aside, rightfully so. John Spencer hooked the ball towards goal, and with his back to goal Sinclair met the ball with an overhead/bicycle kick from outside the box that looped over the Tykes keeper.

 

4 Michael Owen

England v Argentina, 30 June 1998

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hPC6Yv3BPVY

Screen Shot 2015-10-29 at 11.26.09An 18 year-old with no fear, against one the world’s best on the grandest stage of them all. This was the summer the Michael Owen announced his arrival, with this mazy run past three Argentine defenders and the cool slamming the ball into the top corner. Paul Scholes never had a chance of getting that ball laid-off to him.

 

 

3 Ryan Giggs

Arsenal v Manchester United, 14 April 1999

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=quI_LkMj4HI

giggsThe image Giggs chest-wig may be the more iconic image, but it remains because one of the all time FA Cup goals. In the closing seconds of this Semi-Final replay, Giggs took advantage of a misplaced pass from Patrick Vieria, to skip past four Arsenal defenders and then smash the ball past England’s number one.

 

2 Paul Gascoigne

England v Scotland, 15 June 1996

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g0NT6aUwN8c

Screen Shot 2015-10-29 at 11.26.43The 90s was all about Gazza, and this goal was one his finest moments of the decade, during the glorious summer of Euro 96. From Steve McManaman’s through ball, Gascoigne flicks the ball over Colin Hendry’s head and then volleys the ball into the bottom corner. Followed by the now infamous, but brilliant dentist chair celebration. What a summer.

 

1 Dennis Bergkamp

Holland v Argentina, 4 July 1998

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XsZkCFoqSBs

Screen Shot 2015-10-29 at 11.26.58We’ve overlooked Dennis’ stunning goals against Leicester and chosen this peach of skill as the decades’ finest goal. Frank de Boar launched a ball fully sixty yards down field, which Bergkamp controlled in one of the greatest first touches ever seen, then nut-megged Roberto Ayala with the next touch, and then calmly lifted the ball into the net. The greatest goal of the 90s, and so say of all us.

 

You can listen to @AshRoseUK and guests @SiRothstein, @DavidEFraser and @vsanger talk about the decades greatest goals on the latest podcast. They also joined by former Middleborough midfielder Craig Higgnett on the phone.

Follow us on Twitter @AK90S

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Italia 90’s Iconic Kits

Anyone who’s already listened to a even smidge of the podcast so far, will know how much kits play a big part of my memories of the era. Hell, they play a big part of my life in 2015 too, especially when the summer is full of shiny new releases. But the 1990s kits were special, both in their designs and uniqueness that somehow seems them locked into that decade, and none more so than two of the kits on show at Italia 90.

Every generation has ‘their’ England kit; for the 60s it was the 66′ winning away shirt, the 80s are synonymous with the 1982 Admiral and in the 90s it’s always been about the Italia 90 home shirt. As far as retro shirts I don’t think there’s a more popular one than this Umbro effort launched for the World Cup in Italy. Whether it be in reproduced templates from Umbro or real replica’s of their time from the excellent Classic Football Shirts. Just scan a crowd scene at Wembley or in a pub during a live game and I guarantee you someone will be sporting a version of this shirt – usually with the number 19 on the back.

Screen Shot 2015-10-07 at 11.21.43

Why is it so popular though? Well, firstly it’s nostalgic value is down to a glorious tournament for England and the man who donned the number so frequently worn on the back, Paul Gascoigne. As we discussed on this week’s podcast – an Italia 90 special – that World Cup was a renaissance for English football, led by the young Geordie and away from the dark days of the late eighties. Fans fell in love with football again that summer, buoyed by England team who came within a whisker of making it the World Cup Final. That shirt represents the feeling we had that summer, and a team that was full of bonified England legends like Peter Shilton, Gary Lineker and Stuart Pearce.

We as England fans like to celebrate that tournament, and feel the belonging we felt that summer. Of course it helps that the design of the shirt was also one of the very best Umbro offered during their long reign as the Three Lions kit supplier. It had the classic combination of being smart and simple, but with enough clever design touches that made it standout from the rest. The Umbro diamonds round the cuffs of the shirts were typical of that time, but made their debut on this shirt, while the smart polo collar meant it gave the shirt a smart enough reason to wear down the pub as well as the stadium – even now twenty-five years later. Like many Umbro shirts of that time, it had that shiny glow to the shirt, and the diamond pattern embossed into the fabric to really ‘bring it to life’. While the shorts had those 90s colour blocks that were repeated throughout the excellent looking training range.

In short, the kit was and still is one of the greatest England football shirts ever, and is rightly given iconic status in today’s football world….but it wasn’t alone in greatness at Italia 90.

Step forward England’s conquers that night in Turin, and both their home and away shirts of that tournament made by adidas. In a recent countdown on The Football Attic’s 50 Greatest Football Shirts Ever, Germany’s home kit first launched in 1988 and worn at the 1990 World Cup, came in top of the pile.Screen Shot 2015-10-07 at 11.50.24 Whether you agree or not that it’s the greatest ever (for the record, we would plump for USA’s 1994 away kit), theres no doubting it’s atheistic beauty. A simpler rounded collar than England’s street-like style, with the more subtle three adidas stripes, the ‘piece de resistance’ of this shirt was the motif across the chest depicting the German flag with an abstract 90s twist. This shirt was complemented with a memorable mint green change kit, often overlooked due to his connection to the semi-final, but equally as pleasing on the eye.

Elsewhere during that memorable summer there were standout kits for Cameroon and the giant Lion over their heart, Austria’s Puma home shirt and the Scotland yellow and navy striped number. However it’s the kits of the two teams that met in that dramatic semi-final that remain some of the most iconic football strips ever produced.

 

You can buy genuine replica’s of both these shirts at Classic Football Shirts, who we proudly have as sponsor of Alive and Kicking.

Make sure you listen to this weeks Italia 90 themed pod, as Ash Rose is joined by journalist Ben Lyttleton, Seb White of Mundial Magazine and Paddy O’Sullivan. There’s also an interview with Ireland hero, and scorer of their first ever World Cup goal Kevin Sheedy.

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Alive and Kicking: The 90s Football Podcast Trailer

Alive and Kicking the 90s podcast is due to launch on the 10th August. Ash Rose talks about what to expect and pays homage to a decade the changed football forever. If the 1990s are now retro, this this is your retro celebration! From the fun to the farcical, classic to cringe Alive and Kicking has football in the 1990s all wrapped up just for you!

A West Twelve Media production

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Sky Sports are Alive and Kicking

As you may have seen this week Sky Sports launched their advert for the forthcoming Premier League campaign. It features Thierry Henry cleverly dropped into some of the most memorable moments from the League’s past twenty-three years – including many from the 1990s. If you haven’t seen it yet, I’d advise you to check it out because it’s one of the channels best for many a year.

It got me thinking and reminiscing about their first ever Premier League advert ahead of the inaugural season in 1992-93 (to be honest, it doesn’t take a lot for my mind to drift back to then anyway). Of course back then there was none of this high-tech tomfoolery of a current pundit reliving Fergie’s touchline dance or Keegan’s Anfield slump. No we had John Salako taking a shower, Anders Limpar getting breakfast in bed and Paul Stewart swanning around like he was the sixth member of New Kids On The Block. It sounds like a bad Alan Partridge pitch, but to be honest it was one of the most exciting advert’s of it’s era and echoed Sky’s slogan for that moment – a whole new ball game.

In between the memorable moments I’ve mentioned, the bulk of the advert is taken-up by at least one player from each of the twenty-two teams getting ready for the new season. This includes Vinnie Jones mucking around with a hairbrush, and Tony Daley showing off his glistening six-pack while lifting weights. All set to a backdrop of a song that has stayed for me for the rest of my life, and spurned a small brand in my portfolio of work.

‘Alive and Kicking’ by Simple Minds was the song chosen by Sky Sports to echo in this new era for football and the fledgling channel, and whoever made the final call on this deserves a bright coloured Richard Keys blazer for their efforts. As soon as I hear the first few bars of this wonderful ditty, I am transformed back to simpler time, a time when my only concern was football and my obsession with the beautiful game was in full swing. And by the time you get to the chorus and Jim Kerr is belting out the name of the song, I’m lost in a world of Gordon Strachan’s mullet, Darren Anderton doing sit-ups (yes, really) and a young Ash trying to spot Andy Sinton and the QPR badge every time the advert came on the telly.

It’s an advert that can evoke a feeling like no other can, and was why I chose the title of the song as the title of my book – and now subsequent podcast. Actually one of my favourite memories of writing the book was  kindly receiving the image from Sky Sports that accompanied this advert to use in the title. I hadn’t seen this picture for at least a decade, and the nostalgia almost got the better of me when opening that email for the very first time. That image now sits proudly as the cover picture on both our Twitter and Facebook accounts, as that picture and advert sums up the the beginning of the big changes we saw within football during the 1990s.

So for old times sake – and because we’ll be discussing this advert on our first pod next month – take yourself back and watch the advert all over again. Thierry and Sky Sports may have all the high-tech glitz and glamour in 2015, but give me Simple Minds and Sky’s 1992 dream team any day of the week.

‘Ba da da dah dah dah, ba ba dah dah,……’

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Coming Soon – Alive and Kicking: The 90s Football Podcast

Step back in time with Alive and Kicking, The 90s Football Podcast coming this August!

Join Ash Rose – author of Alive and Kicking; The Ultimate Book of 90s Football Nostalgia – and guests, who every week will be looking back and discussing the biggest moments and memories from football in the 1990s. If the 1990s are now retro, this this is your retro celebration! From the fun to the farcical, classic to cringe Alive and Kicking has football in the 1990s all wrapped up just for you!

Make sure you follow us on Twitter @AK90s and like our Facebook page, where you’ll find many more memories from a decade that changed football.